Consider Income When Considering Career

In an earlier post, I referenced an article that discussed Bloomberg’s Shift: The Commission on Work, Workers, and Technology. That’s Bloomberg-as in Michael Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York City. I was shocked at the credit given to the capitalist economic system. From the report: “Today, the poorest Americans have higher living standards-and live healthier, longer lives-than the richest Americans in the 19th century.” It goes on to praise technological advances because increased productivity is the only real way to advance our quality of life. Unfortunately, advancement also means some workers are rendered obsolete. The point of the study was to address the state of workers in the near future (10-20 years). The commission had 100 members in 5 cities create 44 scenarios, which were whittled to 4 scenarios to analyze. More importantly, they surveyed workers about their jobs, satisfaction and expectations.

The conclusions and comments aren’t all that productive. The report seems to mostly provide the opportunity for the members to virtue signal (i.e., talk how much they care about workers). That said, some of the survey results are interesting:

1) There’s the disturbing part about unexpected expenses: 28% said they would have to worry about a $10 unexpected expense. That what my previous post was about.

2) The amazing result, to me, was the response to “What matters most to you about work?” While the report highlights the desire for stability (a top 3 response for every income bracket), a higher response was “Doing things I enjoy”… #1 for all income brackets except $50K-$75K, which had it at #2 (behind stability).

While everyone wants to do things they enjoy, they have to figure out how to get paid for it. Basic Personal Finance points out that work is called work because, for the most part, people don’t want to do it. Picking an occupation is about finding a good or service that you can provide that people are willing to pay for. It is important to consider future job prospects when you decide to invest in yourself through any kind of education or training. Studying a subject that you like but with little prospect of a job (either from no demand or abundance of supply) is not a good investment. Going into an industry on the verge of automation (e.g., truck driving) is also not a good investment.

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